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Fujitsu Lifebook 10.1 Led Net-tablet Pc - Core I5 I5-560um 1.33 Ghz

Fujitsu Lifebook 10.1 Led Net-tablet Pc - Core I5 I5-560um 1.33 Ghz
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Price: $1,399.00 $1,337.22 Saving: 4% In stock
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Fujitsu FPCM11871 LIFEBOOK 10.1 LED Net-tablet PC - Core i5 i5-560UM 1.33 GHz
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love belocura says...

I like this system because of the compact design and the inexpensive price. TH700 is a great little tablet PC that's well worth considering if you want plenty of features, including handwriting recognition. The multi-touchscreen works with a pen or fingers. Onle annoying aspect of the tablet I don't like was its tendency to switch orientation on its own.

d morgan says...

This is my 3rd Tablet PC and the best so far (also have a straight tablet - no comparison for my use)!! Love the DVD R/W is built in v. previous competitive models required an external via pc card slot.This is my business machine and I use the tablet function daily. Use the print function of the journal to highlight / take notes of any document ... creating a more paperless environment.Touch screen function is new - trying to determine if this is worthwhile or just nice to have. Price to value is outstanding.

Robert Cruz says...

A tablet laptop was the right choice for me, and I feel confident that I'm getting what I paid for. There are probably better machines out there that are faster, with better touch screens (this one sometimes seems oversensitive, sometimes completely non-responsive- but that may be user error and I need to get used to using it) and better processors. It's a tad small for a laptop but a great size for a tablet. Definitely just what I needed.

p miles says...

There isn't any other convertable laptop tablet for windows 7 that costs under a grand and has a processor better than an Atom.

Catherine Lewis says...

I've only had this tablet for a couple of weeks, and so far it has performed flawlessly. Browsing the internet, answering emails, playing games, watching movies... everything is a breeze. Very happy so far.

Jessica Gehrke says...

This is my first tablet but I'm an IT technician by trade. Honeycomb is very nice on this - I'm enjoying the customizability. There are tons of great apps and games (so many games) to keep me happy and busy. Unfortunately there's a bit of a problem with some apps not being intended for talet use (and thus having a very small screen size). There are aso a number of apps that just plain don't work because they crash, but judging by the reviews there are apps that crash on any android platform. Asus is rolling out the Android 3.1 update in a week or so from now so it's nice to see the platform is being updated.It's great to be able to use this as a netbook as well, with a full keyboard, flash support, SD, MicroSD, and two USB ports (bring that list down to just flash support and MicroSD if you didn't get the keyboard dock).It's a shame theres not 3G option right now for it, but even if there was I'd get wifi only anyway.People say the Transformer feels flimsy because it's not solid aluminum. I can vouch for its build quality - I dropped it prett good once. The outer plazsitc bezel kinda popped out of place, but I just snapped it back in place and all was well - it didnt crack or break so nothing is brittle (thank goodness).With the keyboar dock I can use this thing off and on for a very long time and the battery meter never drops below 100%, or I can use it for a long time as just a tablet then dock it to the keyboard to charge it back up again. I'm not afraid to leave the brightness and speakers all the way up, with Bluetooth and wifi on all the time because I know the batteries can handle pretty much anything all day long.When you're typing, if you type like I do, your thumb will keep hitting the touchpad and registering a mouse click, but there's a handy button to disable the touchpad which is nice. I like having the option of using the touchpad but I find myself reaching up and using the touchscreen anyway, because it feels natural.I've always been an Asus fanboy, but the way they botched this release (released with nearly bare shelves to begin with) made me wary of the product. I'm glad to say that once again Asus's products FAR more than make up for their lousy customer service and PR department. I love the Transformer and my friends all want one now, too.

katrin seveses says...

Recently picked up a transformer to fully flush out the battle of the tablets from a personal use perspective. I still only have the original iPad and the derided Playbook to compare but these seem to be the three most interesting tablets out there for now...(maybe an HTC Flyer would round out the stable).Overall each has it's strengths and weaknesses.Transformer is my first foray into Android; it's ok, kind of rough on the edges, i find apps crash far more frequently on Honeycomb than other platforms. There is a terrific selection of Apps and it seems developers and companies are releasing apps for Android first or second so pretty much everything you hear about is out there or will be soon. I was expecting more from the Honeycomb interface and usability - it falls far short of the iPad's simplistic approach to use and information but feels much more multi-tasking friendly and it's easier to switch between apps and share information between multiple resources. However since i use a blackberry phone i find the Playbook actually has the most elegant user interface and most intuitive ui, it takes about 20 minutes of using a playbook before you "get-it" but once you use the swipes and gestures both iPad and Honeycomb feel pretty clunky. In fact i am constantly swiping to try to switch apps on the ipad and the Transformer which are both kind of ugly in their back-button approach.Typing and word prediction is pretty good on the Transformer but i have actually switched to a customized split keyboard which i like a lot, it loses the predictive word stuff but is much faster and has a numeric/sym keypad in the middle. This is a stellar feature i believe coming to iPad in Next gen and would also be killer in the Playbook even though the 7" screen is much easier to type on than the iPad or the Transformer. All of these devices basic on-screen keyboards are brutal to use since all of the symbol functions are hidden and require multiple key strokes to hit and return...bad for real alpha/numeric passwords etc. but the options in Honeycomb are great.Google's search integration is incredibly powerful and really makes transformer great for surfing for new info but one of the huge drawbacks to Honeycomb is the screen size. I thought Transformer's 1280 X 800 screen rez would rock but it is not all used for content. The iPad rules in this area with it's browser displaying much more vertical content in the default horizontal surfing position, amazingly the poor playbook at 1024 X 600 actually displays more or the same amount of webpage content as the Transformer. RIM has actually designed a decent little browser which kills it on a 7" screen.Honeycomb has a nice feature which allows you to switch the Browser User Agent so it will be treated as a desktop browser rather than a mobile browser. This is a huge help with certain websites allowing you to hit the fully featured site rather than a crumby mobile site, iPad usually can access all websites and unfortunately RIM is behind here where their browser is often stuck with mobile websites only. It's kind of pathetic sites like CNBC can't figure out which technology should be able to access their main site and still kick a VERY capable browser to mobile site and don't even provide uses with an option to choose.I had hoped Google Docs would rule on the Transformer but it isn't great yet, i suspect they will make complex spreadsheets etc work well in the future but I had thought iOS and Playbook's were really being hampered by Google but it turns out they all don't do it well. This is an area that G/Docs probably needs to work on but hopefully one of these tablets will ultimately make docs work as well as it does on a desktop, not sure why Honeycomb missed this. The keyboard doc helps in that you can more easily navigate with arrow keys and move around the screen and insert changes where on needs to but as a pure tablet it's not great. iOS and Android offer ok methods of inserting your "cursor" where you need it but neither is great and Rim is terrible for this.For maps Google has it nailed and the transformer is really nice, Honeycomb's google advantage shines through here and makes iPad's google implementation seem a little behind and RIM's choice of Bing Maps is awful, thankfully for playbook there are some decent google maps apps out there but these still need to come along to fully compete.Since i don't do games and i am primarily a business user who is looking at how tablets will impact my business on a daily basis and hopefully move our company away from paper and provided a higher level of real time communications and data capture in the field i keep coming back to the Playbook as my personal favorite tablet to use on a daily basis.Admittedly i am a blackberry addict and i am sure this sways my preference and until the Playbook has native PIM apps i wouldn't expect and Android or iphone user to choose the playbook over the the iPad or a Honeycomb device, but one of the most important and least discussed issues in the tablet world is how and when you are inclined to carry and use it. I find with the smaller 7" form factor i always carry the playbook with me, when i am using the ipad or the transformer i really have to think about whether it is worth carrying it with me out ot an appointment. There is something about the paper back size and the ability to whip it out and use it anywhere which makes me feel playbook is a better mobile choice. I always feel like a d-bag when i pull out the ipad or the Trnasformer just to look something up that i could also check on my phone but the 7 inch tablet is really much more usable and mobile for complex data or proposals on the run.Overall i was disappointed with the way the PB launched and it still has some work to go to make it as pretty as an ipad experience and I am anxious to try the 7" HTC honeycomb product to see if this could sway me to feel that Honeycomb is superior but for me the Transformer is too big and just a little clunky to use when compared with the Playbook. When i am couch surfing, i am just as happy grabbing the ipad or the transformer and i think if i was traveling without a laptop i might really need to think about the Transformer with it's add-on keyboard it might really make the difference but at that point it is essentially like carrying a laptop and i am not sure i would see it as more useful. I am just as happy using the palybook for couch surfing but do appreciate the 10" screen size for reading articles when mobility is not an issue.All of these devices are pretty much the same at this point; the iPad has a lot of benefits on the app selection and simplicity of use front it has a rock solid build and iPad 2 is really slick, honeycomb seems to have an edge in the google arsenal of cool things we depend on daily but the Transformer and Samsung Tab feel cheap and kind of disposable, the Playbook has a clear advantage on the elegance of the user interface and portability fronts and is really well built despite a few small software issues in the original build which seem to be worked out in the current os release.If your a blackberry user, i would go with the Playbook or an ipad, if you are an iphone user ipad seems like the best fit until RIM ships the PIM, and logically if you love android on your phone Honeycomb seems like a great fit. If apple were to release a 7" ipad3 i might not feel the same way but for now I have chosen Playbook as my daily device because i actually use it regularly and it does everything i need a tablet for without the bulk and size of the larger solutions.

Honie Vy Carrido says...

Light-weight, portable and a long battery life. It has an optional docking station with full keyboard that turns this into a notebook [although I have the tablet only].Battery life is a terrific 8-9 hours, double that [apparently] if you have the docking station as well.What makes it good is arguably what makes it bad.It's not Apple. I've switch from Apple to Android.With Android's open source operating system you have the freedom to use your files the way you want, no device limits on songs or apps, ability to use the device as a portable hard drive, easy file sharing, no iTunes syncing or erasing your data because it differs from your computer library, flash support for web browsing, in general no limitations.On the other hand, no limits can mean not having standardised protocols. Android can take a little getting used to, learning how to organise and navigate the OS.Also, it seems that there is little quality control for apps and no guarantee that apps that you had for your Apple device will be available or have similar functionality on your Android.Hopefully this will change as developers start supporting Android devices more as they start taking more of the market share from Apple.I like the extra Micro SD card slot so you can expand your storage.It's easy to customise once you get the hang of it and if there is functionality that you feel is missing from the native OS, chances are there is a free app that will give you what you want.The only con I really have is that I wish I got the tablet with 3G functionality.Also, mine appears to have a little bit of light bleeding from the edges of the screen.Speaker could be better but ear buds or phones sound great - which is what I use.

Martin Garcia says...

I use the eeepad both at home and at work. I really like the build quality contrary to a number of reviewers on other sites. The bundled apps provided by Asus are not all great. Notable though are Polaris office, the file manager and MyNet (DLNA media player). Polaris office was pretty surprising, as it outperformed DocsToGo and Quickoffice in both speed and rendering quality, especially wrt docx files. The file manager had a very polished and consistent feel to it. Not too many features, but it did its job very well.Typing on the onscreen keyboard was a little annoying at first, but you get used to it with some practice. If you plan to do a lot of typing, I suggest you go for the keyboard dock.Honeycomb 3.2 update immediately popped up upon booting the device for the first time, which was a pleasant surprise. General usability was on point. Transitions were pretty smooth for the most part with some stuttering here and there. All in all, I'm very happy with the purchase.

den apolinario says...

This form factor is great, most of the benefits of a laptop with the usability of a tablet.The built in web browser is slow at times, i tend to use Dolphin HD or Firefox.I do not like that the Micro SD and SD cards stick out, I would rather have them recessed and have to use a tool to eject them.I would like to see a 3G/4G version soon.I have observed 2 random reboots, and the top function keys seem to be unresponsive at times requiring a reboot.I have also noticed video aberrations switching between programs sometimes.I also notice that USB flash drives and the full SD card slot become unavailable at times requiring a reboot.I am hoping a firmware update will fix these issues

jaime alonzo says...

I debated adding another computing device to our already crowded desktop/laptop(3)/HTPC/Boxee Box environment, but I have to say: Ever since Santa [...] delivered this tablet, I've been using it almost exclusively!The UI is lightning fast. The video is crisp, clear and bright. The battery lasts a full day. And with 32GB of flash memory and a microSD slot, there's no sign of running out of space any time soon. The tablet has already upgraded itself to Android 3.1, which brings more speed and usability. The built-in ASUS apps and widgets are very well designed.Overall, I'm very happy with my purchase, and can't wait for the optional keyboard to arrive.

fidel murphy says...

Tablet has a good solid feel to it and is light enough to easily carry around on public transport. Make sure to update to the 3.1 Honeycomb version, and also update the Dock firmware when prompted to improve mouse and keyboard responsiveness. Using as a tablet without the Dock is great, but I find for web browsing using the Dock is the winner for me.Unit by itself has great battery life, since getting unit 2 weeks ago I've only charged it twice. With Dock attached it lasts even longer.

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