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Pentax K-r 124-megapixel Digital Slr Camera - Black

Pentax K-r 124-megapixel Digital Slr Camera - Black
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Price: $749.99 In stock
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Capture special moments with family and friends using this digital SLR camera that features Sensor-shift Shake Reduction with 4 stops and face detection technology for ensuring images are clear and detailed.
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Anna Morris says...

After recently going to Hawaii and having my DSLR die because of a bit of spray from a random wave I decided it was time to change brands. No DSLR is really water proof but it's a mater of degree and the one I had just didn't cut it. It was fair weather only.Having had Pentax DSLR camera in the past I still had lens so I opted for the K5. It didn't hurt that it had excellent reviews but really it was the seals and the cold resistance that really sold it. This camera goes to Alaska next summer and you absolutely have to have a water resistant camera up there or you stand no chance at all. If you have plans to do that sort of thing don't waste your money on mass market consumer cameras, they just won't be able to handle the downpours etc.Since I got it I have only had a few chance to use it so far, but the results have been very good. Even my old M lens works in one format or another, with the newer ones you get all the features that the camera has to offer. The built in menus are excellent, and the camera has built HDR and multi-exposure capacity on top of the standard stuff you expect. There is even a built in filters menu.The camera feels good in the hand and the metal rather than polycarbonate body is reassuring. The image stabilization seems to work very well and it's built into the body which is a big plus. All and all it's a great camera.

Jane Perez says...

Having owned the K100D, K20D, K-x, and K-7 before picking this one up, I feel pretty well-versed in the history of Pentax dSLRs--I'm quite comfortable in saying that the K-5 is easily the best dSLR Pentax has ever produced.It takes the perfectly designed body of the K-7 and stuffs it with next gen tech that, in my opinion, can't be beat by any other APS-C camera on the market today. The D7000 appears to be a quality camera, but the build quality can't touch Pentax's, and their are reports of softness due to overaggressive noise reduction and anti-aliasing feature. The A33 and A55 from Sony also share a similar sensor, but their "SLT" design will not appeal to purists, who demand an optical viewfinder.If you want the best, this is it.PROS:+ Stellar ergonomics (particularly w/ battery grip)+ Compact/lightweight but very solid build+ Fastest AF in a Pentax dSLR to date+ Very accurate AF+ Seems to require less FF/BF adjustment than my K20D and K-7 (could just be sample variation)+ High-ISO IQ to rival my full-frame Nikon D700+ Low-ISO IQ better than K-7 and K20D+ Excellent auto-ISO mode+ Ability to set in-camera noise reduction level per ISO setting+ 5 user modes+ Incredible dynamic range/RAW headroom+ Colors seem very accurate out of the box+ Shutter even quieter than in K-7CONS:- Lacks 24 and 30fps shooting @ 1080p- Lacks AF during video, manual controls over aperture, ISO, etc during video shooting- AF could still be faster- I have a feeling the SR/blur issue described by Falk Lumo in the K-7 has not been fully rectified in the K-5, but this is speculation until it's properly tested- Doesn't serve me beer

Savings Daily says...

With the K-5 Pentax has addressed almost all of the shortcomings of previous models.I've owned the K100D super, the K20D and the K-x. I've also spent a couple of weeks shooting with a K-r. Since I bought my K100Ds a little over three years ago, I've always recommended Pentax DSLRs as having great performance for the price. The performance of the K-5 is simply amazing.I do a lot of low light photography of dancers. Two weeks ago I was hand holding photos at ISO 12,800, f/1.8 and 1/10-1/15 second. If you need image stabilization with fast lenses, like I do, Canon and Nikon are not an option, their fastest is f/2.8.I've done a couple of informal low light/high ISO tests with friend's cameras. The K-5 is significantly better than the 5DmkII, and surprisingly comparable with the D700. At ISO 6400 f/2.8 1/80 sec (i.e. pretty good light) the D700 seems to have a slight edge. Same cameras, photographing outside at night at 1/10 Sec, the K-5 seemed to have a slight edge. The D700 has been my "if I could afford it, the camera I want" body since it came out, so I'm blown away that at half the price, the K-5 is even close.The compatibility with older Pentax lenses is wonderful. I regularly use full manual K-mount glass, and occasionally even the old M42 lenses.When I bought my K100Ds, I didn't buy the D40 because it wouldn't work well with my AIS mount Nikon glass. If I were starting out with DSLRs today, and I had a lot of AIS mount glass, I'd likely give up the in body image stabilization and get a D7000. Likewise if I were doing a lot of work with speedlights, I'd rather use Nikon speedlights than Pentax.Pentax has greatly improved autofocus and metering in the latest generation of bodies. For shooting action (martial arts, dancing etc) in dynamically changing available light, TAv mode is exactly what I need. I tell the camera what shutter speed and aperture I need, and it gives me the best ISO it can.One thing about the camera that amazes photographers that are not familiar with it, is how quiet the shutter is. You'd think you were shooting with a leafblade rangefinder, not an SLR. The new viewfinder is very good. It's possible that I may not buy a katzeye focusing screen for it, I'll see how often I manually misfocus it. Being able to zoom in when manually focusing in live view is a tremendous asset, especially in low-light situations.The locking mode dial is a feature that I've wanted for ages.I do a lot of band photography under weird color balance, and I wish that the white balance had more range. Granted, lightroom doesn't have enough range either.The dynamic range of this camera is amazing. I've had the flash not fire, taken photos that were almost completely black, and in lightroom applied four stops of exposure correction and ended up with usably clean photos.The features it doesn't have that I wish it did are not really available on most other consumer DSLRs:Histogram based on raw data rather than JPEGI can't use the pop-up flash in full manual mode with the lens in A mode, and even with manual aperture lenses I can't set the power of the pop-up flash.No split prism on the focusing screen.And while this seems a bit silly, my "stormtrooper" white K-x gets so many smiles, I wish the high end Pentax DSLRs came in a variety of colors as well.The raw performance of the K-5 is noticeably but not dramatically better than the K-r. If you don't need the pro-level features and better ergonomics, or you need a camera that you can carry in a cargo pocket with the DA40 on it, then the K-r may be a better buy.

Joy Walters says...

Body of K-5 and K-7 are not much different, I shoot with K-5(just got it a couple of weeks ago), and a few FA limited primes. I love the color Pentax produces, looks very natural, very good color tones… The K-5 has some big improvement over K-7, fps rate, mainly for me is the low light performance; I personally still question the accuracy of the AF-C on the K-5(is definitely better than K-7), but I am wishing Pentax would develop a new AF system that can be more precise and accurate; maybe I am being spoiled by my Nikon D700 3D AF tracking, I don't know, have to wait and see if Pentax can develop something that can match the Nikon 3D AF tracking.The weather sealed body is definitely lovely, I was recently travelled to China this past summer, while being on tour one day, I had my K-7 out in the rain for over 2-3 hrs with my Pentax DA* 16-50mm lens(not weather sealed at the lens and body attachment), I had no issue with the camera and the lens. Very nice to have a camera that I wasn't really scared of taking out in the bad weather and very reliable to use in any condition… definitely looking forward to have a nice journey with my new K-5…

Maybelyn Jenkins says...

I upgraded from the K-7. K-5 keeps the excellent design, unparralleled build quality, super quiet shutter sound and outstanding ergonomics of K-7, has the best APS-C sensor. High ISO performance is stunning. What worth mentioning is that the Low ISO performance is also outstanding, noticably better than the K-7. Also, the super high Dynamic Range is very helpful. AF speed is not much improved, but much more decisive. For DA* SDM lenses, the speed is not improved at all. All my lenses are SDM, but I find the speeds are fast enough. The AF-C mode is much improved, but can be improved further. The camera is fun to use, I bet everybody who has a K-5 loves it.I'd like to comment on the following two problems:1. stained sensor problem was solved already, all cameras having serial number larger than 3973*** are fine. Basically this problem is now worry free.2. The bad Auto Focus under artificial light condition. I believe this is a relatively unusual problem that happens on a few bodies. Don't be afraid about this, just buy one and try it at home. If it does happen (very little chance), then exchange for a new one.I have hand-on experience of Canon 7D and Nikon D7000, I would say the K-5's image quality (from ISO100 to ISO3200) is on par with D7000, better than the 7D. K-5's build quality is on par with the 7D but much smaller, D7000 falls behind in this regard.I highly recommend the K-5.

Watchman says...

I'm a life-long Pentax user, starting with the K1000, the ME, KX…then entered the DSLR world with the K10D and have stepped up with each new model. I loved the K-7, but some of its limits bothered me. The K-5 overcomes these. I'm a busy amateur shooter, traveling in the US, Europe and Israel, shooting in all kinds of coniditions. The weather-sealing is a huge plus for me. The direct, simple interface, the use of buttons, the smaller form-factor than equivalently capable cameras, all commend the Pentax to me. The K-5 autofocuses much more quickly than the K-7. I never thought the K-7 was as bad as some, but the K-5 clearly makes a jump ahead. Likewise, the high ISO performance of the K-7 was often criticized, so the K-5 significantly improves that feature. I love the USER mode on the K-7, so having 5 USER modes on the K-5 is a welcome feature.All the things I loved about the K-7 are here with a bang on the K-5.It's hard to think of things I don't like. I have not had the "stained sensor" problem, nor have I had problems with incandescent lighting and auto-focus, problems others have reported. I wish that the video mode used the constant focus rather than the fixed autofocus.Overall, the K-5 does everything I need it to do very well. It's a solid package, compatible with all the lenses, even the battery of the K-7. Ergonomically its excellent. My only problem is a tendency to hit the AE-L or Green button when handling the camera. I purchased my K-5 from B&H.

Ismael Landrigan says...

Differences between the K-5 and the K-7:The body is the same except three things. The mode dial is now 1/3 higher making it much, much easier to get hold of. With the K-7 it could sometimes be fiddly to change mode due to the lock mechanism but not so much anymore. There are now a little white text below the RAW-button "Fx" and it now says K-5 instead of K-7.The rest of the differences are inside the body. First off is the new sensor offering widely improved ISO-performance (according to me better than the kx). The buttons on the K-5 are also more customizable; for example the RAW button can now be assigned the functions RAW-button, exposure bracketing, digital preview, electronic level (graphical on the LCD) and composition adjustment.There are also some new functions in the camera but i haven't tried them all so i won't comment that. The AF speed is much faster than on the previous model. The continious shooting is also faster.All in all it's the wonderful sturdy body of the K-7 with some needed updates for tackling the competition (wich it really does well).

Watchman says...

I finally upgraded from my Pentax *istDL to the Pentax K-5. Features that made me upgrade were the lower noise levels, the shake reduction and the RAW+JPEG shooting mode. Because I have an assortment of Pentax lenses, I wanted to stick with Pentax.First, make sure to get the firmware updates. The focusing, in my opinion, was greatly improved with the 1.03 firmware update. The shake reduction does a great job; I'm able to hand-hold a 500mm lens and still get clear shots at fairly low (ISO 400) speeds. The low-light abilities of the camera are great. I can take night shots with a large dynamic range that would not have been possible with my older camera.When previewing images, it may seem images are blurry, but part of the issue is that when you zoom in on the 16 megapixel images, you are zooming in much further than you ever would on a 6-8 Mpixel camera. When I did a side-by-side comparison with my old camera using the same lenses, you could clearly see the sharper detail with the K-5.The color reproduction of the camera appears to be very good. With a high-quality prime lens like the Pentax DA 21mm, the images are incredible.The built-in electronic level indicator is good if you are trying to setup a panoramic shot on a tripod. (One less thing to carry in your bag.)When using the different shooting modes, it does take some time to figure out what you can change and what is automatic in each shooting mode. On the istDL in manual, the same dial was used for adjusting the shutting speed and aperture. On the K-5, you have separate dials for each, which is nice if you shoot manual a lot. The green mode is great if you see something like a wild animal and need to get shot quick--everything gets set to the fully automatic defaults--maybe not your personal preferences, but you will get a usable shot that you would otherwise miss.If you use older Pentax lenses without an auto aperture setting, it can be hard to check your light meter settings with preview and also adjust the front dial at the same time, but you do have the option to change the function of the dials, if it becomes a problem. I also have large hands so the camera does fit my hand perfectly, but I wouldn't say it is uncomfortable.I agree it is a little difficult getting the SD card out of the camera. The design hasn't really changed from the istDL, but when they added the rubber seal on the door, it took away some room to grab the card. You worry that if you push the door back too far, it might break, but if you push it just a little, you can get a hold of the card with your fingernails.Some people have said the shutter is quiet, but it still makes a fair amount of sound. (People standing next to you will probably still hear it.)Overall, I like the camera and haven't found anything it is missing. I did upgrade my memory card due to the larger file sizes.

Lynnftw says...

As a longtime shutterbug going back to H.S., I've never had the rig to suit me and my preferences. I went from a classic Canon FT that my dad brought back from Vietnam to a Canon EOS 850. Later on... I purchased my first digital offering in a Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ10K ultrazoom which had a build quality to it that was solid (and the amazing Leica glass) but lacked the manual controls of the FT nor the auto-focus of the 850. I thoroughly enjoyed using it even if it was only 4.0 megapixel, used a smaller-sized sensor, had very average (now poor) ISO performance, and wasn't really a pro-level camera at that time.I then secured a Canon EOS Rebel XT on closeout when a major electronics chain went belly-up. It wasn't exactly what I was wanting (I was actually thinking of trying Nikon at that point or even contemplating a move to Micro-Four Thirds) but it was a deal I couldn't refuse and it was a superior camera (on paper) to the Panasonic. The image quality and controls were superior to the Panasonic (i.e. manual controls on the body vs. pinned in a menu or requiring 2-3 different button presses to access what should be readily available), but the overall build quality and construction left a lot to be desired. As someone that went to school for Industrial Design, the feel of the bulbous and hollow feeling plastic of the XT gave me a very sterile feeling to my photo shooting experiences (I've since given this camera to a relative and kept my old Panasonic, a testament to how much I loved the Panny). I often found myself desiring to use the Panasonic more because it was a delight to hold. I vowed that when I did my next upgrade... I'd find the best of both worlds.I think I've found that in the K-5.I'd studied various Pentax cameras in online reviews for awhile and one of the key selling points was the quality feel that even the cheaper K-X and K-R models had. I was actually originally planning on going with the K-X and then later on the K-R but the desire to have 2 jog wheels for manual controls and the desire to have an all metal body won me over. It also didn't hurt that the K-5 has been lauded with reviews putting it right up there with the various full-frame models on performance and just a smidgen ahead of Nikon's D7000; itself a camera I seriously considered myself despite knowing that similar glass to the Pentax with stabilization (VR) would cost an even heftier chunk of change than on Pentax.The K-5 exudes quality from every piece of it's being. There's not a single part of it that's not solid and crafted in a finely machined way, with a heft and solidity that brings pleasure in just holding it. The controls are ergonomic and placed properly. The array of manual controls available is head and shoulders above anything I've had since the FT (and probably even superior to it)... and yet, the electronics on-board provide the level of assistance with metering I've not experienced since my father's ages-old AE-1 Program. We came from a Canon family so there was some trepidation in going outside of the confines but I can vouch that this move, thus far, seems to be one of the best I've done.I'm into motorsports and purchased this body with the 18-135mm and 55-300mm telephoto lenses for shooting in the pit areas and from the grandstands at many tracks I attend (short track pavement and dirt oval racing). I just recently took my first shots with the 55-300 at Rockford Speedway for their Big 8 series show and the photos that I took came out exceptional. Obviously, going Nikon or Canon you can gain advantages with a plethora of high-end large USM & stabilized telephoto lenses but... getting them with stabilization adds extra cost on top of lenses that often weigh into the $1,000's of dollars. While to some this is the achilles heel of the competition to "Canikon" as some refer to the juggernaut brands, the reality is that for a good chunk of the photographic world... those lenses are cost prohibitive and if we buy anything other than basic telephotos we're more inclined to go after a good prime or a standard length telephoto vs. the monsters used by many top photographers. In that vain... Pentax has some of the most lauded primes out there, esp. for the $.So for the majority of most people's uses, Pentax and Tamron and Sigma and others provide lenses that'll suit the needs and can take advantage of the superiority of having in-body stabilization available on the K-5. For some lenses from Tamron or Sigma that come with their own stabilization (often larger telephotos), you still have the option to shut off the in-body stabilization and take advantage of the optical stabilization. So yeah... for some sports where you need fast and long glass Nikon and Canon probably have their significant advantages, but for the majority of users... the Pentax glass is both cheaper and in some cases better quality per $. You also can use any K-mount glass (i.e. manual focus) dating back to the 1970's... something you can't do with Canon since they changed mounts with EF in the late 80's and 90's for EOS. Even some of the Nikon bodies don't support the full gamut of AF glass w/ autofocus.If you're looking for a lighter body or aren't averted to composite bodies or don't need full manual controls... this camera might be overkill. In that case the K-R or Canon EOS 60D or a Nikon D5000 or other competing cameras might suit the bill better. The K-5, despite being fairly compact, is quite heavy (similar sized to the Rebel XT I had but probably weighs almost 2x's as much). That said... if you need weather resistance (with WR lenses like the amazing 18-135mm which I highly recommend), want access to some amazing primes, want the option to score some older high quality manual focus glass at garage sales and estate sales, and the option of some pretty solid offerings through B&H (easily my favorite photo retailer out there)... I personally highly recommend the Pentax K-5.

Apple Lee says...

I usedto be a Nikon user(I still own my D700) mostly shooting birds over the weekends as hobbyist, the weight of the gear got to me and I developed severe shoulder problems. This is my favourite hobby and so,I was looking for a gear that I can manage on long hikes and not loose the image quality.This camera meets my needs and more. The AF is not as good as the Nikon D700 or D3 and Pentax does not make long lens over 300mm (but even if they did I could not carry one anyway). The FA and DA 300mm lens are great and easy to use handheld.The SR mechanism is a great help when not using the tripod.The images I get out of this camera is equal in quality to the ones I get from D700 with out the weight. Weather sealing is great in rain and dusty conditions which is a plus for out door photography.My only peeve is the lack of AF tracking with AF lock on.Other than that I am pretty satisfied with this camera.

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